How Inventory Shifts are Impacting Purchase Decisions

When it comes to buying trucks and equipment, the majority of owner-operators prefer the used market, according to Overdrive’s Truck Purchase and Lease Survey. Out of all of the survey’s respondents, 56% of them reported buying used trucks, 32% bought new, and less than 10% leased their trucks or equipment.

However, while purchasing used trucks and equipment is preferred among owner-operators, finding said trucks and equipment at a fair price is more challenging than ever. Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic and the delays in production, brought on by component shortages, many owner-operators are forced to consider other purchasing options.

Unfortunately, truck dealerships aren’t receiving much in the way of new inventory. In 2021, new trucks were being ordered, but they wouldn’t arrive until December. And, to top it off, fewer trade-ins are making their way onto the lots, thus pushing prices of used trucks through the roof. In 2021, used trucks retailed for the most they ever have in the modern era. For example, a used sleeper, with over 450,000 miles on it, sold for a little over $90,000. This price was approximately 85.5% higher than the previous year. And while some industry professionals anticipated a slow descent in used truck prices in 2022, others caved to the pressure of the market and sold off their fleets for substantial amounts of money.

Photo Credit: Overdrive

Are higher lending rates to come?

Industry experts also predict that new truck production will eventually catch up and balance out. Once trucks start rolling off of assembly lines, used-truck buyers will want to consider the potential financing impact new truck production could have on trade-ins with higher mileage than normal. 

Financing a used truck is already a challenge due to the higher risk lenders take since used trucks typically face engine problems. When the trade-ins that drivers clung onto in lieu of new inventory arrive at dealerships, they will arrive with higher mileage and a higher risk of performance issues. Thus, lenders will be even more hesitant when drivers request financing and likely raise lending rates.

For small fleets, experts believe it may be wise to consider extending the life of their trucks and equipment through maintenance rather than buying new or used. And for any owner-operators who are searching for a used truck in today’s market, they can also expect higher down payments. In fact, those just entering the industry should be prepared to put 25-35% down. Overdrive recently surveyed a group of drivers who recently bought a used truck to further prove the state of the market. They found that 38% of used-truck buyers paid in cash, and 57% of buyers financed with a bank loan or through a captive or specialty lender.

Is a lower interest rate possible?

Despite all of this, there are ways to acquire a lower interest rate on your loan. The main factors that lenders look at to calculate the monthly payment include your credit score, the model year of your truck, how much money you put down, the owner/driver’s business experience, and your resourcefulness. 

“I’d rather lend money to a guy with a 600 credit score whose father was an owner-operator, grandfather was an owner-operator, brother is a diesel mechanic, and maybe his credit score is down because of divorce,” Grivas said. “That’s a great risk compared to a guy with a 700 credit score who’s just getting started.” 

When buying a new truck, experienced owners and drivers can expect a single-digit interest rate. However, drivers financing a used truck will see interest rates ranging from 10-13% or higher.

How Mission Financial Services can help.

We understand that sometimes times are tough and we’re here to get you back on the road to financial independence. Whether you’re a first-time buyer, have limited driving experience, or have bad credit, we can help.

Mission offers direct lending for owner-operator purchases, lease purchase buy-outs, repair loans, and title loans for operating capital. And even better, we will perform a complete review of applications and get you an answer within four hours.

Our approvals are structured as simple interest contracts with limited terms that let you build equity in your loan quickly to avoid additional finance charges. Mission considers all applicants living in all states except Hawaii and Alaska. And we offer affordable loans and report to all major credit bureaus so you can start turning your credit around. Why wait?

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How is the Microchip Shortage Affecting Truck Prices in 2022?

Rising Fuel Prices: An Ongoing Problem for Drivers

How Does Prop. 22 Affect App-Based Drivers?

Rising Fuel Prices: An Ongoing Problem for Drivers

5 Tips for Conserving Fuel

These days, the glowing numbers on gas station signs cause drivers to wince as they pass. What once was affordable for most drivers now costs anywhere between $4 and $6 a gallon in some areas. This surge in fuel prices has become a top concern for consumers, affecting drivers and the broader economy. 

Higher fuel prices, especially diesel, strain owners and operators, affect the cost of goods that require transportation via truck, and so much more. In this article, we will look at the reason behind increasing fuel prices, who they affect, and what drivers can do to conserve their fuel.

Fuel prices continue to climb, but why?

The Russian invasion of Ukraine primarily influences today’s surging fuel prices, however, prices were on the rise well before the war. Before the COVID-19 pandemic settled in, energy producers reduced their investments and cut back on projects that were less than profitable. Once the pandemic hit, these same producers minimized output even more as the need for petroleum diminished due to quarantine restrictions.

The economy has since reopened, goods are being manufactured, and the roadways are filled once again. The reboot of society led to a surge in demand and a tightening oil market that led President Biden to tap into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in hopes of leveling prices, but this plan failed.Once Russia invaded Ukraine, the already fragile energy market was sent spiraling downward. With Russia being the largest oil exporter in the world and the U.S.’s ban on Russian oil imports, U.S. oil reached its highest price point since 2008 at $130 per barrel.  

Oil companies are now reluctant to drill and face obstacles like labor shortages and increasing prices for parts and raw materials. On top of that, Russian petroleum product exports are being sanctioned, pushing the price of diesel higher than ever.

All of these factors contributed to the national average of a gallon of gas reaching $4.589, according to AAA. Now, every state in the U.S. averages more than $4 per gallon. In some areas, like California, they’re averaging above $6. And diesel prices retail at an average of $5.577 a gallon, which is 76% higher than last year’s average.

Who is affected by rising fuel prices?

Higher fuel prices impact not only consumer spending but also company spending, affecting many industries, including transportation. For instance, Target is the latest company to speak out about its struggles with higher costs. Target CEO Brian Cornell said, “We did not anticipate that transportation and freight costs would soar the way they have as fuel prices have risen to all-time highs.” Cornell estimates that the higher fuel costs will run the company approximately $1 billion in incremental costs this fiscal year. Walmart executives had similar concerns, “fuel ran over $160 million higher for the quarter in the U.S. than we forecasted.”

But the prices aren’t just impacting domestic costs. Companies like Tractor Supply and Amazon have noted that their import freight costs have increased over the last year. Currently, the cost to ship an overseas container has doubled compared to pre-pandemic rates. Even the airline industry is experiencing the effects of higher fuel prices. The CEO of United Airlines explained that jet fuel prices would cost the company $10 billion more than in 2019.

The ultimate worry for freight companies is how the higher fuel prices will affect the overall cost of operations. A carrier moving shipments from the West Coast to the East Coast will have to pay approximately $1,000 more in fuel costs than in 2021. If things continue in the same direction, this inflation will impact truckload shipping, ocean freight shipping, air cargo shipping, and train shipping costs, which will ultimately cause a domino effect throughout the economy.

Source: truckstop.com

5 Tips for Conserving Fuel

Conserving fuel is no longer just a want or a good deed. It’s now something we must do to save money. In the U.S. alone, the trucking industry consumes approximately 38 billion gallons of diesel annually. And 39% of drivers’ operating expenses come from fueling their rig. So, drivers must do what they can to improve their fuel economy.

Here are a few ways they can do so:

1. Drive more responsibly

Follow speed limit signs and take things slow. Studies show that every 5 mph over 65 mph yields a 7% decrease in fuel economy. You can also do things like:

  • Switch off the air conditioner (weather permitting)
  • Avoid idling unnecessarily
  • Turn off your engine when not in use
  • Use cruise control on the highways (if possible)

2. Improve your truck’s aerodynamics

Research shows that about half of a truck’s fuel is consumed, overcoming aerodynamic drag while traveling at highway speeds. Lucky, there are a few simple ways to improve your truck’s aerodynamics, including using a roof-mounted cab deflector, a deep angled bumper, or a sun visor to push wind to the top of your trailer. You can also use side fairings to avoid turbulence underneath your trailer.

3. Be conscious of the traffic conditions

Every time you have to restart your rig due to stop-and-go traffic, you use a considerable amount of fuel. So, it’s essential to use your GPS and monitor traffic conditions to get to your next location efficiently. Avoiding traffic will also help your clutch last longer.

4. Engine oil & fuel

By simply using the recommended grade of motor oil for your truck, you could improve your fuel mileage by up to 2%.

We also recommend:

  • Filling up your truck first thing in the morning
  • Pump fuel at a low setting to minimize vapors
  • Fill up well before you reach ‘Empty’

5. Conduct regular maintenance checks

Regular maintenance can go a long way in saving you fuel.

Maintenance practices include:

  • Filling up your tires and changing them when needed
  • Checking your trailer and drive axle alignment
  • Watch for any fluid leaks
  • Invest in an engine overhaul if yours is older
  • Replace any old or worn-out parts, like fuel injectors

At the end of the day, improving your fuel efficiency by 2% to 3% can help you save your hard-earned money and keep your rig running like new.

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Top 6 Ways for Fleet Owners to Conserve Fuel

How to Save on Diesel Emissions Repair Costs

What to Consider When Rebuilding Your Diesel Engine

FAQ: Restoring vs Buying New

Every day, all across the country, heavy-duty trucks travel thousands of miles delivering products and keeping our economy flowing. Those miles can be taxing on diesel engines, and without proper care and maintenance, you could find yourself in need of a new one. However, there is another option.

Instead of buying a new engine, you may be able to salvage the one you have by rebuilding it. While the quality of your rebuild depends on the parts and mechanic skills you have, it’s a much cheaper option than purchasing a whole new engine—especially as costs continue to rise.

Is restoring an old engine better than buying a new one?

While it may seem more cost-effective to replace your worn engine with a brand-new one, the fact is rebuilding your engine could save you hundreds of dollars and help you avoid mechanical hurdles.

Overall, it is less expensive to obtain a small repair loan and complete an engine overhaul than it is to finance a new truck. When you buy a new semi, you will be met with a minimum five-year payment plan, eventual repair costs, and more. Repairing/rebuilding your engine will buy you more time with your tried and true truck and save you money in the long run. 

Repairs can be even cheaper (and in some ways easier) if your rig is older. Newer trucks often have computerized systems and components that are expensive and hard to obtain due to the current microchip shortage. However, the parts and labor needed for older semis are relatively easy to get and manage.

To top it all off, older diesel engines are more reliable in some ways. When it comes to your used engine, you know what to expect and prepare for in terms of issues, efficiency, and performance. Plus, engines that have been around for a long time have proven to be longer-lasting, whereas newer engines don’t come with a proven track record.

What you need to know about rebuilding your engine

As previously mentioned, performing proper care and maintenance on your diesel engine ensures optimum performance and longevity. Eventually, you will need to rebuild your engine to improve your truck’s mileage and extend its lifespan. 

When it comes time to rebuild your engine, there are a few things you ought to know. Here are some frequently asked questions and answers to help.

Q: How do I know if my diesel engine is bad?

The most common ways of detecting a bad diesel engine include:

  • Increased oil consumption
  • Strange sounds coming from your engine
  • Increased fuel consumption
  • Issues with engine braking
  • Loss of power/Truck won’t start

–> How to identify when a clutch is failing

Q: When should you rebuild a diesel engine?

Typically, engine rebuilds are performed every 12,000 to 15,000 hours. However, you could extend time in between rebuilds with proper care and maintenance.

Q: How do I know if my engine needs to be rebuilt?

You need to rebuild your engine if:

  • A knocking or buzzing sound is coming from the engine’s bearings.
  • Oil burns on gasoline/Your exhaust smoke has a white hue.

Q: How long will a rebuilt diesel engine last?

If done correctly, an engine rebuild should last more than 100,000 miles. This will depend on the type of engine, however.

Q: What mistakes should I avoid when rebuilding?

The main mistakes to avoid when rebuilding include:

  • Not taking proper measurements of bearing clearances, crankshaft, cylinders, ring end gaps, etc.
  • Not having a clean and organized workstation.
  • Not recording as you dismantle your engine.
  • Using old or worn fasteners or other supplies.
  • Rushing through the process of the rebuild.

Q: Are rebuilt diesel engines reliable?

Yes! It has been proven that engine rebuilds are more reliable, safe, and effective than replacement engines.

Q: How much does an engine rebuild cost?

Engine rebuilds can vary in cost. Everything from the engine’s make to the level of the rebuild can impact the amount you’ll spend. However, the average overhaul cost ranges from $20,000 to $40,000.

–> How to save on diesel emissions repair costs

How a commercial repair loan can help

When your truck engine breaks down or needs parts and repairs, your income and livelihood are put on hold until fixed. And if the repairs or parts required aren’t within your budget, you could be facing quite the predicament. Fortunately, Mission Financial Services can help by offering specialized commercial vehicle repair loans that assist in covering the cost of repairs and help get your rig back on the road

To obtain a commercial vehicle repair loan, you will need to complete and submit three online forms, including a credit application, vehicle spec sheet, and sales order.

Top-Selling Transportation Equipment in the U.S.

Over the past two years, a shortage of heavy-duty vehicles has left the shipping industry between a rock and a hard place. This shortage has also caused owners and operators to rely heavily on the trucks they already own or battle for the few that enter the used market. However, depending on your location, some trucks and trailers may not be as readily available as they are in other parts of the country.

In this article, we will break down the top-selling heavy-duty trucks and trailers, what they’re used for, and which regions they are the most popular in.

Most Popular Commercial Trucks and Trailers 

The most commonly sold trucks and trailers include:

  • Box Trucks – Dry Cargo-Delivery: Box trucks (also known as dry cargo-delivery vehicles) are made to transport most goods and products. They are also considered the most common freight vehicle used for shipping. 
  • Cab & Chassis Trucks: These heavy-duty trailers are used when your haul requires unique configurations for safe transportation.
  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper & Conventional Day Cab Trucks: Conventional trucks are used for local and regional use, but they also work well for cross-country hauling.
  • Drop Deck Trailers: These trailers are like flatbeds, except they have a lower deck that helps haul taller loads.
  • Dry Van Trailers: Dry vans are typically used for shipments that do not require refrigeration or heating.
  • Dump Trucks: Also known as tippers, dumpers, or tip trucks, dump trucks carry loose materials like construction debris, dirt, or gravel.
  • Flatbed Trailers: Flatbeds are level trailers made from aluminum, wood, and steel and are typically used to haul oversized loads and heavy-duty equipment.
  • Hopper/Grain Trailers: These trailers are designed with sloped sides and multiple hoppers and transport grain and other items in mass quantities.
  • Reefer Trailers: Refrigerated trucks (also known as reefers) are typically used by the meat and dairy industry to transport all perishable food items.

Top-Selling Trucking Equipment by Territory

When it comes to sales, it’s no secret that some products sell better in certain regions. For example, swimsuits and sunscreen tend to sell better in warmer parts of the country, like Florida, as opposed to colder regions, like Alaska. The same idea can be said for heavy-duty equipment, such as trucks and trailers.   

Discover which trucks and trailers pair best with which regions below:

Central

  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Flatbed Trailers
  • Dry Van Trailers
  • Drop Deck Trailers

North Central

  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Dump Trucks
  • Hopper/Grain Trailers
  • Box Trucks – Dry Cargo-Delivery

South Central

  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Flatbed Trailers
  • Dump Trucks
  • Box Trucks – Dry Cargo-Delivery

Mid Atlantic

  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Dump Trucks
  • Flatbed Trailers
  • Reefer Trailers

Great Lakes

  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Dump Trucks
  • Flatbed Trailers
  • Dry Van Trailers

Western

  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Reefer Trailers
  • Dry Van Trailers
  • Cab & Chassis Trucks

North Eastern

  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Dump Trucks
  • Box Trucks – Dry Cargo-Delivery
  • Cab & Chassis Trucks

South Eastern

  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Reefer Trailers
  • Dry Van Trailers
  • Flatbed Trailers

Mountain West

  • Conventional Trucks with a Sleeper
  • Conventional Day Cab Trucks
  • Reefer Trailers
  • Flatbed Trailers
  • Dump Trucks
Image Credit: TruckPaper.com

Why a repair loan is important now more than ever

Don’t let the cost of repairs and the current truck shortage slow you down. As a truck driver, your vehicle is your lifeline. When it breaks down or needs parts and repairs, your income and livelihood are on the line. And if the repairs or parts required aren’t within your budget, you could be facing quite the predicament. Fortunately, companies like Mission Financial Services can help by offering specialized commercial vehicle repair loans. These loans assist in covering the cost of repairs and help get your rig back on the road

To obtain a commercial vehicle repair loan, you will need to complete and submit three online forms, including a credit application, vehicle spec sheet, and sales order.

How to Identify When a Clutch is Failing

5 Signs of a Bad Clutch

For heavy-duty trucks, the clutch plays a crucial role in the rig’s full functionality. The mechanical piece acts as the link between your engine, transmission, and driveshaft and allows drivers to shift between gears while hauling freight. The clutch also optimizes your engine’s performance, maximizes your rig’s fuel economy, and helps drivers achieve top-notch safety, when properly maintained.

While most clutches are designed to withstand long hauls and excessive use, these mechanical links are not indestructible. The fact is, at some point in your driving career, you’re guaranteed to replace a clutch or two. How often you replace them depends on several factors, including how well you operate the equipment and the amount of maintenance you put into it—but you’ll still replace the piece, eventually.

Signs of a failing clutch and how you can fix it.

As previously mentioned, the life of a clutch can vary depending on the application, hauling frequency, and the weight of your cargo; even the amount of traffic you face can have an effect. And while some modern rigs offer a maintenance light for the clutch, older rigs don’t have the luxury. So, how do you determine a failing clutch before it becomes a dangerous problem?

Here are the most common indicators to listen and feel for when determining the state of your clutch:

1. The engine is running fast, but the rig is moving slow.

When it feels like your engine is running faster than your rig, you may be experiencing “clutch slippage.” This issue occurs when the clutch’s ability to generate friction is compromised. 

The issue is, the clutch relies on this friction to turn the flywheel, and without it, the clutch has to work harder to produce less energy, resulting in the engine running harder than your truck. This could also cause your engine to be noticeably louder when accelerating.

So, what causes slippage, and how do you fix it? Generally, slippage is caused by wear and tear on the clutch or heat damage from “burning the clutch.” The problem can also be due to an oil or transmission leak, or occur when the pressure link is damaged or does not transmit adequate force due to a blockage or rust damage.

2. When the clutch pedal is pressed, you hear a squealing or chirping.

If your clutch pedal is squealing or chirping, it’s likely due to an issue with the throwout or pilot bearing. To avoid this problem, regularly check the parts and keep them well-lubricated to avoid frequent rubbing.

3. The pedal is noisy, sticky, spongy, or loose.

If you notice the pedal making any abnormal noises or feeling sticky/spongy, you may be looking at an issue with the clutch fork. This problem can be due to inadequate lubrication or general deterioration and can be determined/fixed by a technician.

If the pedal squeaks or feels loose, you may need to replace the pedal’s spring or another ill-fitting component.

4. The clutch won’t engage.

A few different things could cause this issue of a sticky or unresponsive clutch. For starters, there may be an issue with the clutch pedal not being compatible with a specific part or component. However, you could also be looking at a problem with the clutch disc or pressure plate. 

The possibilities for this problem are somewhat endless, so it’s best to have a technician run further diagnostics tests to determine the cause and solution.

5. You hear a grinding noise.

This grinding noise is often called a “dragging clutch.” While this could result from an issue with the pressure plate or throwout bearing, it’s typically a problem with the release mechanism. 

When you press the clutch pedal, your clutch should release so you can change gears without grinding them. However, if there’s a problem with the release, the gears will create a grinding sound and, in turn, damage your transmission.

You will most likely need a new clutch assembly to resolve this problem, but you should have a technician inspect your pedal to ensure all components are correctly installed.

If you notice any of these signs, it’s vital to make an appointment with a trusted mechanic or service technician. They will be able to diagnose your clutch’s issue properly and determine which parts and/or repairs you may need.

How to optimize the life expectancy of your clutch.

Whether you’re replacing parts of your clutch system or replacing the entire mechanism, every truck driver will eventually be forced to replace their clutch. However, with proper maintenance and regular inspections, you can optimize the life and performance of your clutch and keep on trucking. 

Below are the best ways to keep your clutch in top shape

1. Don’t ride the clutch.

You’ve probably heard this statement before, but it’s essential for a long-lasting clutch. After a long haul, it can be easy to rest your foot on the clutch pedal or leave it halfway down to make changing gears more manageable. But, in the long run, the minimal amount of comfort you will achieve is not worth the excessive amount of damage to your clutch and transmission.

Bottom line, when you aren’t shifting gears, keep your foot off of the clutch. Instead, use the dead pedal or the floor.

You should also avoid using your clutch as an alternate brake or as a way to prevent your rig from rolling back on hills.

2. Be sure to shift gears properly.

To properly change gears, only shift after you’ve fully engaged the clutch and keep the pedal down until you’re in gear. Once you’re where you want to be, come off of the pedal quickly and smoothly.

It’s vital to the longevity of your clutch to make decisive changes. And while a few modulations may be necessary when coming out of first gear, it’s essential to not leave your clutch in between the “engaged” and “disengaged” positions for too long.

3. Always park in neutral.

When parking your heavy-duty truck, be sure to park while in neutral. To do so, put your transmission in neutral, then apply your parking brake. After that, shift into first gear if facing uphill, or reverse if facing downhill. Following these steps will not only prevent your rig from rolling away but will also ensure that there is no excess pressure on your clutch.

How a repair loan can help.

When your truck breaks down or needs parts and repairs, your income and livelihood are put at risk. And if the repairs or parts required aren’t within your budget, you could be facing quite the predicament. Fortunately, Mission Financial Services can help by offering specialized commercial vehicle repair loans that assist in covering the cost of repairs and help get your rig back on the road

To obtain a commercial vehicle repair loan, you will need to complete and submit three online forms, including a credit application, vehicle spec sheet, and sales order. 

5 Most Common Truck Problems and Repairs

With the need to meet the ever-increasing “just-in-time” demand for delivery timelines, changing logistics, and sweating the assets in longer life cycles of duty, it’s easy to slack on the preventive maintenance schedule.  

As an operator, having the best tools in your toolbox to solve common problems and knowing when to make needed repairs is the key to meeting your target’s deadlines and keeping your rig rolling on schedule. That means that you’ve got to know all about the requirements of truck repair. Let’s explore some of the more common repairs that fleet operators see with today’s trucks.

1. ENGINE OVERHEATING

An overheated engine can cause many residual effects on a truck. For example, the issue might be a blown gasket, or something related to the fuel tank. Regardless, over time, this can lead to engine failure if the problem is left too long. Therefore, working with a maintenance professional is crucial to review and address signs of overheating on your vehicle. In the long term, this can prevent failure at a critical time and save you big bucks.

On average, here is what you will pay for “check engine” related repairs per state:

TOP 10 MOST EXPENSIVE STATES

California$410.73
Connecticut$406.49
Colorado$403.03
D.C.$400.68
Utah$395.86
Georgia$395.05
New Jersey$389.23
Montana$388.71
Tennessee$388.13
Virginia$387.76
Data: Forbes

2. STARTER FAILURE

Starter mechanisms should be reviewed more often as the colder weather approaches. Starter failure can become a common problem in the winter months. Clear signs of issues with a starter will likely be noticed by the operator first, and the ignition will only get worse as the temperature outside gets colder. During the motor start phase, nonessential components (such as radios) should be turned off in order to diagnose the problem.

*Read 5 Tips for Winterizing your semi-truck.

3. U-JOINT FAILURE

U-joints are necessary for power to transfer to the differentiator from the transmission. The U-joints must be lubricated to minimize wear and tear, and if the U-joint is about to fail, a driver may notice a clicking sound. Another sign of imminent U-joint failure can be vibrations at higher speeds. If a driver experiences either of these signs, at the earliest convenience, the U-joint has to be replaced.

4. BRAKE ISSUES

A comprehensive strategy for brake maintenance is critical. On a regular basis, likely due to the pressure from today’s larger payloads, modern trucks frequently experience issues with brake pedals or the braking system. Brake fluid leaks and even total brake failure can occur if trucks have not been maintained effectively. Fortunately, if one brake fails, the independent brake system still allows the driver to stop using the other brakes.

5. WHEEL BEARINGS & TIRES

In order for your wheel to move along the road with as little friction as possible, important components called wheel bearings are necessary. While they’re moving, if the driver notices an unusual amount of noise generated from the wheel wells, the bearings could be degraded. Another sign could be unstable road movements or a jerking feeling of the truck. Even if your tires are properly inflated, these types of problems are extremely common. Make sure to always replace worn out tires and keep plenty of spares on deck.

*Read 7 Crucial Tips for Tire Maintenance and Repair!

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE

Federal safety regulations require all semi-trucks to have a full inspection by a qualified inspector annually. The inspection must meet the federal guidelines, performed by someone with the proper training, certifications, and experience.

*Check out these Tips For Staying in Compliance

Having a five-plus year plan of what you will need to replace could aid in planning and avoiding a show-stopping price tag. In addition, with the current post-COVID-19 climate, finding OEM assets required can be challenging in an emergency. Being prepared and aware of your options can be very critical in a crisis.

Semi-truck maintenance can be expensive and unpredictable, but it’s a necessary evil that comes with ownership. It’s tempting to put off repairs until damage occurs, but regular maintenance is crucial to preventing more severe problems down the road.

Want more information? Check out our blog, Everything You Need to Know About Annual Semi-Truck Maintenance.

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